Ant-Man and the Wasp – It Takes Two

Story7.5
Script8
Directing7.5
Acting8
Effects8
Humour9
Reader Rating2 Votes8
To make a thing go right!
Great fun without it getting too excessive
Contributes to the bigger picture without losing focus on the... smaller stuff
Meow, Michelle Pfeiffer, meow!
To make it outta sight!
The plot isn't as focused as the first one
One of the less fun post-credits scenes
Not enough Bill Foster!
8

It’s been a sombre year for the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Between the brutal reality presented in February’s Black Panther, and the grim conclusion to the recent Avengers: Infinity War, it seems like Earth’s Mightiest Heroes—and their fans—are in for dark times.

Thankfully, Ant-Man and the Wasp, set prior to the events of Infinity War, brings with it a healthy dose of levity and drives the narrative back to the smaller things of the universe. Literally.

Jogging things back to the impact of Captain America: Civil War and the Sokovia Accords, Ant-Man and the Wasp sheds more light on the terms of the UN agreement and how it affects non-Avenger superheroes. While the movie deals with the fallout of the “big picture” Marvel stuff, the narrative very smoothly transitions to the science and mythology behind Hank Pym’s inventions and the microverse.

While the plot isn’t as sharp as its predecessor, the script remains every bit as fun and witty, making familiar characters all the more lovable while adding a few new good ones along the way. With the inclusion of Wasp, who functions as a well-oiled, incredibly honed and functional foil to Ant-Man’s brand of slick luck and unorthodox thinking, the action reaches new heights (again, literally) in terms of choreography and use of their size-changing abilities.

While Ant-Man and the Wasp will probably never reach the heights of other Marvel sequels, villainess Ghost will hold a special place in the list of Marvel villains. Breaking the mould for villains who are simply reflections of the heroes (Iron Monger, Abomination, Whiplash, Winter Soldier, Killmonger) Ghost nevertheless retains an origin that links itself to the science behind Ant-Man’s abilities.

While Marvel’s not had a great track record with sequels of their more comedy driven movies, like the borderline idiotic Thor: Ragnarok and the straight-up annoying Guardians of the Galaxy: Volume 2 that had me wishing for the deaths of Star-Lord, Rocket Raccoon, and Drax, Ant-Man and the Wasp displays a level of self-control that allows you to enjoy the humour without finding it excessive.

Paul Rudd’s take on Ant-Man/Scott Lang has always presented itself as an underdog. With Evangeline Lilly’s Wasp/Hope van Dyne, however, the Marvel Cinematic Universe may have just found it’s Dynamic Duo!

Ant-Man and the Wasp occupy the big screens from the 4th of July!

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